Posts Tagged With: skiing

Five things you should do in Seoul

If you’re planning a visit to Seoul, there a couple of things that you should know before you go.

  • It’s absolutely MASSIVE.646
  • It’s really difficult to navigate your way around. The subway system is extensive but there are very few signposts pointing out the way to the various tourist attractions.

Put these two things together and the result is that you won’t manage to fit in nearly as much as you think you will. Therefore, I’ve selected five things that I think you really should do whilst you’re in Seoul.

5 – Gyeongbokgung Palace

There are several former royal palaces in Seoul but the biggest and grandest is Gyeongbokgung. If you arrive at the right time, you can see the changing of the guard ceremony. Even if you don’t time it right, you can still get pictures with the traditionally dressed guards before wandering around the palace grounds. The view of the palace, with the mountains behind, when you walk through the main gate, is extremely impressive.

How to get there: Gyeongbokgung station is on Subway Line 3.

4 – Insadong

Insadong is (or is trying to be) to Seoul what Gion is to Kyoto or the Hutongs are in Beijing. In a city where antiquity definitely takes a back seat to modernity, Insadong is a place where you can still find pockets of traditional Korean culture. There are lots of quirky little shops and art galleries to explore. The main attraction is the traditional tearooms and restaurants, where you can get authentic Korean food. We paid 12,000 KRW each for Bibimpbap (rice topped with sautéed vegetables), pajeon (a delicious savoury pancake) and all the accompanying side dishes, including the ubiquitous kimchi. The restaurants in Insadong certainly aren’t cheap, but the food is some of the best in Seoul. Be careful about ordering a kimchi and pork broth though. I’d lived in Asia for two and a half years before eating this and I was completely unprepared for the atomic spice hit that I got. I think my lips stopped stinging about eight hours later.

How to get there: Anguk station is also on Subway Line 3. Insadongil (the main street in Insadong) is a two minute walk from the station. It’s also possible to walk from Gyeongbokgung.

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3 – Escape the city for a day

According to Rough Guides “the vast majority of tourists to Korea get no further than Seoul.” Considering the compact size of the country and its excellent rail network, it seems like a lot of tourists are missing an opportunity. With the exception of Jeju Island, pretty much everywhere in South Korea is accessible in a day trip from Seoul. The most popular trip is to the DMZ, which is the no man’s land dividing the two Koreas. Unfortunately for us, our attempts to go there were about as successful as the supreme leader’s diet. We were reliably told by various sources that we could book DMZ tours four days in advance. However, when we arrived in Seoul, we discovered that all the days we wanted were booked up. If you really want to go I’d recommend booking a couple of weeks in advance. Alternative day trips close to Seoul include Bukhansan, reputedly the world’s busiest National Park, and Suwon Fortress. If you can spare a couple of days though, do what we did and go to one of the many ski resorts that are within a couple of hours of Seoul. Alpensia and Yongpyong, where we skied, are due to host the downhill events in the 2018 Winter Olympics. So we were kind of blazing a trail for the pros.

How to get there: There are buses to Yongpyong ski resort every morning from outside Seoul Olympic stadium. We booked our three day ski trip with a company called Sally Tours, whom I’d highly recommend. They also do DMZ tours.

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2 – Namsam Park and N-Seoul Tower

Namsam Park is an oasis of greenery in the midst of a concrete jungle. The park is pleasant to walk around but the main attraction is the N-Seoul Tower, which gives spectacular views of Seoul’s vast urban sprawl. From Seoul station, it is a ten minute walk to the park entrance. You can then walk up to the top of the hill, where the tower is located. Alternatively, if you’re pregnant, have mobility issues or you’re just plain lazy, there’s a cable car that does the same trip. To walk from the park entrance to the tower, it should take around 45 minutes to an hour. It gets pretty steep in parts so be prepared to get a bit hot and sweaty. Once you get to the top, there’s a plaza area where there are dancers and cultural performances. My favourite was a sword fighting demonstration. There are also a number of shops, including a Teddy Bear Museum, which absolutely delighted Janey. You can then pay 10,000 KRW to go to the top of the tower. This seems steep but the views are definitely worth the admission fee. I also liked the window displays, which showed how far various domestic and world cities are from Seoul. The fact that Pyongyang is closer to Seoul then Busan is seemed to underline the absurdity of the division between the two Koreas. Namsan and the Tower make a great afternoon out and I think it would be particularly appealing to anyone travelling with children.

How to get there: Seoul station is on Subway Lines 4 & 5. Walk out of the main exit and follow the signs for Namsam Park.

1 – Great Taekwondo Demonstration

Taekwondo is Korea’s national sport and one of the world’s most popular martial arts. It is unsurprising therefore, that Kukkiwon, the world taekwondo headquarters is based in Seoul. Every weeknight from 5 – 6 pm, tourists can go and watch a one hour demonstration performance. I love martial arts so I was always going to go. It’s testament to how incredible the show was that Janey, who isn’t really a fan of pugilism, enjoyed it nearly as much as I did. Mixed gender teams of young martial artists demonstrate an incredible repertoire of kicks jumps and throws, showing incredible grace and agility in the process. Interspersed with this, there are a few traditional dance segments, which I think are designed to show how taekwondo forms an intrinsic part of Korean culture. The best part of the performance is when the martial artists break blocks of wood with flying kicks and flips. At the end, audience members are invited up on stage to have a go at breaking one of the wooden blocks. There was no way I was missing that opportunity. I thought I was going to end up flat on my arse but somehow I did it. The kick was true and the wood broke into two pieces. The fact that the wood was almost certainly balsa is entirely irrelevant. At that moment, I felt like Bruce Lee.  It was the perfect ending to a truly memorable experience. Surprisingly, there were only about thirty people in the audience for the demonstration. It might not be one if Seoul’s best known or most popular attractions but, for me, it was definitely the best.

How to get there: Take Subway Line 2 to either Gangnam (yes that Gangnam) or Yeoksam. Kukkiwon is roughly equidistant between the two.

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Categories: Asia, Seoul, South Korea | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Skiing in Niseko

Ask most non-skiers where they think the best ski resorts in the world are, the chances are they’ll say Switzerland or France. Some might suggest the Canadian Rockies. Hardly any will mention Japan. However, surprisingly to many, the land of the rising sun is one of the world’s very best skiing and snowboarding destinations. Japan receives an incredible 5.5 metres (18 feet) of snow a year, nearly all of which is fresh powder. If you’re into winter sports, that’s the stuff that dreams are made of. There are also over five hundred different ski resorts to choose from. One stands head and shoulders above the others though; Japan’s answer to Whistler, the truly majestic Niseko.

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Janey and I were lucky enough to spend four days in Niseko over Christmas, the centrepiece of our three week holiday to Japan. From the moment we arrived there, we fell in love with the place. That was despite having to endure a blizzard on the way from the bus station to our lodge. We later found out that we could have organised a pick up! The lodge itself was a large part of what made our stay in Niseko so memorable. Sat by a roaring log fire, with a cup of hot mulled wine, whilst the snowstorms raged outside, it felt like heaven on earth to me.

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Our first day of skiing, on Christmas Eve, was a frustrating one. It had been twenty months since our previous trip to the Sierra Nevada in Spain. Where had all the progress gone? I couldn’t seem to even change direction without falling over! The only consolation was that falling into the powder snow, felt like falling into the softest pillow you could ever imagine. December 24th was spent in Gran Hirafu, the largest of the four connected resorts that make up Niseko United. On Christmas Day, we went to Annupuri, which was much quieter and far closer to our lodge. I started tentatively at first, but bit my bit my confidence started to grow. I was doing entire runs without falling over! Then, on about my fourth run, I just let it go. I was skiing with complete confidence and freedom. The feeling of liberation was incredible. On the final run before lunch, we then got an amazing surprise Christmas present. For the first time in three days, the clouds cleared, and were treated to some absolutely mesmerising views of Mount Niseko.

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When I woke up on Boxing Day, every muscle in my body ached. My lower back was stiff and walking downstairs was a bit of an ordeal. Even though it was our last day, I couldn’t find any motivation. That was until Alan, the lodge manager, told me “there’s not many times in your life when you’ll ski on sixty centimetres of fresh snow.” SIXTY CENTIMETRES?!?! Was that really how much had fallen overnight?! Apparently it was and remarkably all my aches and pains disappeared rather rapidly. Within half an hour we were back out on the slopes for one of the best days of my life so far. In the morning, we sessioned the green runs four times, to refine our techniques, in preparation for taking on a red run. This had been my aim at the start of the three days. Now it was time to make it happen. When we stepped out of the gondola, at the top of the red run, the conditions were atrocious. Visibility was about two metres, the temperature was about minus ten, and the winds meant business. Getting to the bottom in one piece was going to be a bit of a test! Amazingly, we proved to be up to the challenge. It took about half an hour as we had to frequently stop to check that we were going in the correct direction. However, in the end we made it to the bottom without falling once. This was utterly exhilarating and a proud achievement. So we did it again for good measure, this time in slightly more clement conditions.

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The only thing that could top that morning was what was to come later in the day; night skiing. If there is one problem with Niseko, it’s that the majority of time the visibility isn’t good. The Siberian winds and eighteen feet of snow might have something to do with that. However, once the afternoon light fades, the floodlights are switched on, and the effect is just magical. Visibility is perfect, and to make it even better, the slopes are practically empty. Skiing through thick powder, on an almost empty piste in what felt like the middle of the night, is one of the best things I’ve ever done. We rounded off the day with a trip to the natural onsen (a volcanic hot spring) and some hot sake. Life really doesn’t get much better.

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Leaving Niseko the next day was one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do. I’ve caught the skiing bug badly. Our first trip to Sierra Nevada planted the seed. Niseko made it blossom into a true and burning love! I now think regularly about different places we could ski in around the planet. Mongolia, Serbia and Chile are some of the more random ones I’ve come up with. One thing is for certain though; wherever we go next, it will be almost impossible for it to match up with Niseko.

TRAVEL TIPS

Annupuri Oasis Lodge is one of the best places I’ve ever stayed in. I’d choose to stay there over any five star hotel. Visit their website at http://www.annupurioasislodge.com/

Categories: Asia, Japan, Skiing in Niseko | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning to ski in Spain

Have you ever tried something for the first time and wondered why you’d never tried it before? For me, that something was skiing. Until a couple of years ago I’d never had the opportunity to ski, except on something that resembled a giant brillo pad in deepest darkest Lancashire. I never went on a school skiing holiday, and most of my travelling (despite my gingerness and near-albino skin) has been done in hot countries. One February weekend in 2013 I went to Sierra Nevada, in Spain, and it was an instant love affair. Snow – great, fresh air – great, travelling very fast downhill – great, and the possibility to get intoxicated afterwards – great! Why had it taken me so long to try this?!

Sierra Nevada is the highest ski resort in Spain, and the southernmost ski resort on Europe It is less than 100 kilometres from the Mediterranean coast, meaning that you could feasibly ski and swim on the same day! The resort is most easily accessed from the city of Granada. A bus from the central bus station there takes just 45 minutes to reach Sierra Nevada. The fact that it’s a relatively small resort makes it good for learning, as you’re not battling for piste space. We went on a puente (a Spanish public holiday weekend) and the slopes still weren’t too packed. Obviously, one does not just rock up and start skiing like a professional though. We had some basics to learn! We booked our tuition through the British ski center. Our instructor Giles was a veteran of about twenty ski seasons. He was extremely knowledgeable and had a calm demeanour. He was also very tolerant of my habit of crossing my feet and Janey’s confusion between her left and right. On the first morning we learnt the very basics; how to start, stop, change direction and how to do a snowplow. We considered ourselves very lucky that there had been a massive dump of snow the previous, so our many falls were adequately cushioned!

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The first day of the trip we made limited progress. It was the second day when the love affair really began. After proving ourselves on the nursery slopes, Giles took us on one of the lifts for the first time. Somehow we tentatively made our way to the bottom, with Giles looking uber cool, skiing backwards in front of us. After he left us, we went back for some more. I hit the deck again several times, Janey skied off onto a different piste. However, slowly, run by run it started to come together. Slaloming down the slopes with a crisp wind whistling past my ears, I felt truly alive. It was also just as exhilarating as any extreme sport that I’ve tried. After making it to the bottom unscathed several times, I felt like some sort of bossman, just for conquering a blue run. Then I realised that I couldn’t ski down to the town, as that run was too technical and I’d probably be looking at months of physio as a result. Still, there’s always next time for the red runs, then there’s the black runs. After that off-piste, then heliskiing in the Rockies, then who knows?! The Winter Olympics in South Korea in 2018?! Ok, maybe I’m getting slightly carried away but the point is, I REALLY caught the skiing bug badly!

Janey and I both left Sierra Nevada determined to continue skiing. Since then fate got in the way, as our next job after leaving Spain, turned out to be in Malaysia, where I’m not sure if a snowflake has ever fallen. However, where there’s a will there’s a way. As soon as I arrived in the Orient, I was planning our next ski trip, to the world class slopes of Japan. It couldn’t come soon enough. I needed my next hit. 032

TRAVEL TIPS

I’d highly recommend the British ski center if, like me, your Spanish is only conversational. Check out their website at http://www.britishskicenter.co.uk/

Categories: Europe, Skiing in Sierra Nevada, Spain | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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