Posts Tagged With: Seoul

Five things you should do in Seoul

If you’re planning a visit to Seoul, there a couple of things that you should know before you go.

  • It’s absolutely MASSIVE.646
  • It’s really difficult to navigate your way around. The subway system is extensive but there are very few signposts pointing out the way to the various tourist attractions.

Put these two things together and the result is that you won’t manage to fit in nearly as much as you think you will. Therefore, I’ve selected five things that I think you really should do whilst you’re in Seoul.

5 – Gyeongbokgung Palace

There are several former royal palaces in Seoul but the biggest and grandest is Gyeongbokgung. If you arrive at the right time, you can see the changing of the guard ceremony. Even if you don’t time it right, you can still get pictures with the traditionally dressed guards before wandering around the palace grounds. The view of the palace, with the mountains behind, when you walk through the main gate, is extremely impressive.

How to get there: Gyeongbokgung station is on Subway Line 3.

4 – Insadong

Insadong is (or is trying to be) to Seoul what Gion is to Kyoto or the Hutongs are in Beijing. In a city where antiquity definitely takes a back seat to modernity, Insadong is a place where you can still find pockets of traditional Korean culture. There are lots of quirky little shops and art galleries to explore. The main attraction is the traditional tearooms and restaurants, where you can get authentic Korean food. We paid 12,000 KRW each for Bibimpbap (rice topped with sautéed vegetables), pajeon (a delicious savoury pancake) and all the accompanying side dishes, including the ubiquitous kimchi. The restaurants in Insadong certainly aren’t cheap, but the food is some of the best in Seoul. Be careful about ordering a kimchi and pork broth though. I’d lived in Asia for two and a half years before eating this and I was completely unprepared for the atomic spice hit that I got. I think my lips stopped stinging about eight hours later.

How to get there: Anguk station is also on Subway Line 3. Insadongil (the main street in Insadong) is a two minute walk from the station. It’s also possible to walk from Gyeongbokgung.

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3 – Escape the city for a day

According to Rough Guides “the vast majority of tourists to Korea get no further than Seoul.” Considering the compact size of the country and its excellent rail network, it seems like a lot of tourists are missing an opportunity. With the exception of Jeju Island, pretty much everywhere in South Korea is accessible in a day trip from Seoul. The most popular trip is to the DMZ, which is the no man’s land dividing the two Koreas. Unfortunately for us, our attempts to go there were about as successful as the supreme leader’s diet. We were reliably told by various sources that we could book DMZ tours four days in advance. However, when we arrived in Seoul, we discovered that all the days we wanted were booked up. If you really want to go I’d recommend booking a couple of weeks in advance. Alternative day trips close to Seoul include Bukhansan, reputedly the world’s busiest National Park, and Suwon Fortress. If you can spare a couple of days though, do what we did and go to one of the many ski resorts that are within a couple of hours of Seoul. Alpensia and Yongpyong, where we skied, are due to host the downhill events in the 2018 Winter Olympics. So we were kind of blazing a trail for the pros.

How to get there: There are buses to Yongpyong ski resort every morning from outside Seoul Olympic stadium. We booked our three day ski trip with a company called Sally Tours, whom I’d highly recommend. They also do DMZ tours.

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2 – Namsam Park and N-Seoul Tower

Namsam Park is an oasis of greenery in the midst of a concrete jungle. The park is pleasant to walk around but the main attraction is the N-Seoul Tower, which gives spectacular views of Seoul’s vast urban sprawl. From Seoul station, it is a ten minute walk to the park entrance. You can then walk up to the top of the hill, where the tower is located. Alternatively, if you’re pregnant, have mobility issues or you’re just plain lazy, there’s a cable car that does the same trip. To walk from the park entrance to the tower, it should take around 45 minutes to an hour. It gets pretty steep in parts so be prepared to get a bit hot and sweaty. Once you get to the top, there’s a plaza area where there are dancers and cultural performances. My favourite was a sword fighting demonstration. There are also a number of shops, including a Teddy Bear Museum, which absolutely delighted Janey. You can then pay 10,000 KRW to go to the top of the tower. This seems steep but the views are definitely worth the admission fee. I also liked the window displays, which showed how far various domestic and world cities are from Seoul. The fact that Pyongyang is closer to Seoul then Busan is seemed to underline the absurdity of the division between the two Koreas. Namsan and the Tower make a great afternoon out and I think it would be particularly appealing to anyone travelling with children.

How to get there: Seoul station is on Subway Lines 4 & 5. Walk out of the main exit and follow the signs for Namsam Park.

1 – Great Taekwondo Demonstration

Taekwondo is Korea’s national sport and one of the world’s most popular martial arts. It is unsurprising therefore, that Kukkiwon, the world taekwondo headquarters is based in Seoul. Every weeknight from 5 – 6 pm, tourists can go and watch a one hour demonstration performance. I love martial arts so I was always going to go. It’s testament to how incredible the show was that Janey, who isn’t really a fan of pugilism, enjoyed it nearly as much as I did. Mixed gender teams of young martial artists demonstrate an incredible repertoire of kicks jumps and throws, showing incredible grace and agility in the process. Interspersed with this, there are a few traditional dance segments, which I think are designed to show how taekwondo forms an intrinsic part of Korean culture. The best part of the performance is when the martial artists break blocks of wood with flying kicks and flips. At the end, audience members are invited up on stage to have a go at breaking one of the wooden blocks. There was no way I was missing that opportunity. I thought I was going to end up flat on my arse but somehow I did it. The kick was true and the wood broke into two pieces. The fact that the wood was almost certainly balsa is entirely irrelevant. At that moment, I felt like Bruce Lee.  It was the perfect ending to a truly memorable experience. Surprisingly, there were only about thirty people in the audience for the demonstration. It might not be one if Seoul’s best known or most popular attractions but, for me, it was definitely the best.

How to get there: Take Subway Line 2 to either Gangnam (yes that Gangnam) or Yeoksam. Kukkiwon is roughly equidistant between the two.

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Categories: Asia, Seoul, South Korea | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

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