Posts Tagged With: food

Twelve reasons to love Vietnam

  • There is no such thing as a load that is too big to be carried on the back of a bicycle or scooter. Pigs, patio chairs, lawnmowers; they can all fit on the back of a tiny Honda cub. It’s also not that uncommon to see entire families of five or six people on the one moped.
  • Standard traffic rules don’t seem to apply in Vietnam. When approaching a crossroads, you shouldn’t slow down, you should continue at exactly the same speed and honk your horn. It’s everyone else’s responsibility to get out of YOUR way.

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  • Being on the back of one those speeding motorcycles is simultaneously the most terrifying and most exhilarating moment of your life, up to that point.
  • Pavements are definitely not for walking on. They are where business is done. Entire shops and restaurants are situated on tiny patches of pavement. If you want to walk, you’re going to have to take your chances in the road.
  • Speaking of the street hawkers, there is literally no dish that the Vietnamese cannot prepare in a wok whilst crouched down on the street. Ask them politely enough and they’d probably be able to whip you up an entire Sunday roast.
  • Sticking with the food. It is SENSATIONAL. Easily some of the best that South East Asia has to offer and surely there’s no higher compliment than that. Any cuisine that can make both tofu and cucumber taste good must truly be one of the world’s finest.
  • The coffee is pretty bloody awesome as well. In Hanoi, don’t be alarmed if you get egg in your coffee. The Vietnamese are just so good at this kind of thing that they actually make egg coffee work.
  • If you happen to like a beer or two, than Vietnam is the place for you. It has absurdly low prices. In Hanoi, I got two pints for eighty-three pence. TWO PINTS FOR EIGHTY-THREE PENCE! It’s probably a good job I don’t live there.
  • The Vietnamese appear to be rather fond of a drink themselves. We went cycling in the countryside round Hoi An one Saturday morning and passed a couple of wedding parties. Everyone was leathered and the karaoke had already started. It wasn’t even midday.
  • We went on a Halong Bay cruise. Some of us jumped off the top deck of the boat into the water. The captain went absolutely mental. Five minutes later the other crew members were throwing beers down to us, that we drank in the bath like waters of one of the world’s most beautiful bays.092
  • Every hour is happy hour, not just in bars and restaurants, but also at market stalls. Happy hour can also be extended from a 10pm finish until a 3am finish if enough people are buying cocktails.
  • The real highlight of Vietnam though is the people themselves. They are friendly and innovative (especially when it comes to making money) and they have some of the best standards of customer service that I have encountered anywhere in the world. They’ll go out of their way to ensure that your stay in Vietnam is a memorable one. And they’ll succeed.

TRAVEL TIPS

Two places that we stayed at in Vietnam are worthy of the highest praise and recommendation. Finnegans, in Hanoi, was one of the best hotels that we’ve stayed at in Asia. It’s got a great location in the heart of the old town in Hanoi, and the staff are absolutely outstanding. When we took a taxi to the train station to take us to Hue, one of the hotel staff followed us on his motorbike just so he could show us to our beds on the train. http://hanoifinneganshotel.com/

Just as impressive was the Tea Gardens homestay in Hoi An. Thanh, the lady that runs the place (pictured above)is absolutely lovely. No favour was too much to ask and every question was met with a smile. Furthermore, for the price, the room was seriously luxurious. http://teagardenhomestay.com/

 

Categories: 12 reasons to love Vietnam, Asia, Vietnam | Tags: , , , , | 8 Comments

A week in Morocco

There aren’t many countries that can truly say that they offer everything to the tourist. Morocco though, most definitely can. From the soaring peaks of the high Atlas mountains, to windswept sandy beaches, and rolling sand dunes in the Sahara, the landscapes are stunning and varied. Throw in ancient cities, a distinct and delectable cuisine, and the fact that it’s a shopper’s paradise, you can see why it holds such an appeal for so many travellers. Morocco had captured my imagination for a long time before I went there. I sensed my chance to finally go when I got a job in southern Spain in 2011. As soon as I arrived in Andalusia, I was dreaming of what lay across the straits of Gibraltar. The opportunity arose when we had a week off work for Semana Santa, Spain’s Easter week holidays.

Our journey started in our home city of Cordoba. From there we took the train to Algeciras, and then a local bus to Tarifa, where we boarded our ferry to Tangier. There was something gloriously exciting and old-fashioned about travelling between continents by ship. Upon arrival, we checked in at the Hotel Continental, which overlooked the port. The hotel had an air of faded grandeur, which added to the feeling of old-fashioned travel. It was probably THE place to stay in Tangier in a bygone era. After a while, we braved the labyrinthine streets of Tangier’s medina and our senses were assaulted in every way. This was our first taste of North Africa, and the Arab world, and it probably showed. An old man who was dressed like Yoda approached us. Upon hearing that we were from Manchester, he proceeded to tell us that he was a personal friend of Bobby Charlton and had guided him round Tangier in the 1960s. It was almost certainly nonsense but it was highly amusing. After he had finished regaling us with his tales, and quibbling about the tip we gave him, he took us to a local restaurant, which in fairness to Yoda was absolutely outstanding. The subtly spiced Moroccan cuisine would continue to work its magic on us for the entire week.

The next day we left Tangier and headed to Chefchaouen, the blue city in the Rif Mountains. There we stayed at a hostel called Rif for anyone, or Dar Scotlandee to the locals, in reference to the Scottish couple that owned the place. Terry and Suzanne, and their son Liam, were superbly hospitable and had what could be best described as a relaxed and libertarian approach to life. Other than exploring the blue painted medina, the thing to do in Chefchaouen is hike. There are a number of superb trails in the Rif Mountains. Unfortunately for us, bad weather (which was to follow us round for our entire trip) scuppered these plans so three days in Chefchaouen was probably one too many.

Our next destination was Fez. I’ve done a lot of travelling and consequently taken a lot of bus journeys. This was up there with the very worst of them. Admittedly, I’ve never driven a bus. However, for my money, the best way to approach tight winding mountain roads that are covered in potholes, is to take it slowly and carefully. Our bus driver clearly didn’t agree. His approach was to drive like an absolute madman, tearing round each corner at terrifying speeds. All round the bus people were being sick. It was one of the longest five hours of my life!

Fez, when we finally arrived there, was worth all the tortures inflicted on the journey. Going into the medina was like stepping back in time several hundred years. While we were exploring, we were approached by a young man named Hassan, who offered his cousin’s services for a trip to Volubilis. Against every traveller’s instinct we said yes. It turned out to be the best decision we made in our time there. The day trip was the undoubted highlight of our holiday. Volubilis is a remarkably well preserved set of Roman ruins, located about 100 kilometres from Fez. Due to Janey’s archaeological background this was one of the things that she was most looking forward to in Morocco. It certainly didn’t disappoint. The weather conspired against us again though. When we arrived at the ruins, the skies were blue. Within a few minutes, they had turned to black and a thunderous downpour ensued. At times it felt more like we were in North Wales than North Africa! The other two destinations that we visited on our day trip provided an interesting contrast. The small town of Moulay Idriss is auspicious for Muslims. However, it didn’t feel very welcoming to tourists and we were glad to be back in the car after a few minutes. Meknes on the other hand was a delight. The buildings were charming and we ate some spectacular street food for an obscenely low price. Said, Hassan’s cousin, also proved to be an excellent driver and guide.

After the tour, we were left with one more day in Fez. Janey, who had been holding back until now, went in search of souvenirs. I normally hate shopping with a passion but in Fez it was awesome! In Morocco haggling is obligatory and I loved it. Every transaction gave me the chance to test my skills against a true expert of the art. Overall, I think I did quite well. My haggling skills probably saved us a total of about fifty euros which is not a bad result when battling with the best!

Before we arrived back in Spain, there was time for one more challenge. We needed to get an overnight train from Fez to Tangier, so as to get the morning ferry back to Tarifa. This was made particularly tricky by our Riad’s refusal to organise a taxi for us. Therefore, we had to venture out into the Fez night to find one for ourselves. Thankfully after a few minutes we were successful, and all I had to do was stay awake until we had to change trains at Sidi Kacem. Eighteen hours after leaving the Riad we arrived back at our flat in Cordoda. This journey seemed to encapsulate our entire trip to Morocco. It was hard work, absolutely exhausting but utterly exhilarating.

TRAVEL TIPS

In Fez we stayed at a Riad called Riad Lalla Fatima. Upon first glance it looked beautiful. However, it turned out to be a dreadful place to stay. Firstly, at no other hotel or hostel in the world have the staff told me that they can’t organise a taxi, no matter what time I was leaving. Furthermore, on our final night we ordered a home cooked meal. Janey has been vegetarian for nearly twenty years. She was therefore highly distressed, and violently sick, when she discovered that her vegetarian couscous had chicken in it. Instead of apologising for the mistake, the staff had the gall to deny the visibly obvious. If I gave this place a 1 out of 10 rating it would be generous. Don’t stay there.

Categories: A week in Morocco, Africa, Morocco | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Penang: Hawker heaven

As this is my very first blog I thought I should start with some background information. Janey (my girlfriend) and I moved to Penang, to take up EFL teaching positions, a little under two months ago. For those that don’t know Penang is an island located off the north-west coast of peninsular Malaysia. Despite it’s relatively small size the island has established itself as an essential destination on the itinerary of many a tourist to Malaysia. The reasons for this are many and varied. The capital Georgetown is a UNESCO world heritage site, mostly down to it’s incredible architecture. At Batu Ferringhi, one can enjoy the kind of beautiful beach that is more associated with neighbouring Thailand. However, for many people the real highlight of a visit to Penang is the food which is reputed to be amongst the very best in Asia. When we first told friends that we had been offered jobs in Penang, the initial response of anybody who had previously visited here was to wax lyrically about how amazing the food is. After spending the last eight weeks sampling as much of it as is physically possible I certainly wouldn’t disagree.

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The principal reason for Penang’s gastronomic excellence lies in the incredible ethnic diversity of the island. Large Chinese and Indian communities have lived on the island since the days of British colonial rule, allowing their cuisines to supplement ethnic Malay favourites such as Nasi Goreng. The proximity to the Thai border also ensures that some truly spectacularly hot dishes can be consumed. My first encounter with a Thai noodle soup, named Laksa, left me feeling like I could see through time. Furthermore, when you consider that it’s also possible to find Japanese, Korean, Moroccan and even Bulgarian restaurants here, you get some idea of the culinary diversity of the place.Image

Despite the undoubted excellence of many of these restaurants, they are most definitely not the best place to eat in Penang. As with any Asian city the best flavours, and value for money, can be found by trying the street food. In Penang this is condensed into large hawker centres. These are basically big outdoor market places where it’s possible to try pretty much all of the aforementioned cuisines. Image

If these places existed in England, over-officious health and safety muppets would have them closed down within a day. But this is the Orient, and such concerns don’t exist over here. And thank heavens for that. Not only is the food of a superb quality it’s also ridiculously cheap. A standard dish at a hawker centre will usually set you back about 5 Malaysian ringgits. That’s about £1 or less than 2 USD!

It’s difficult to recommend any dish in particular, such is the choice. However, some perennial favourites are worthy of consideration. Claypot chicken rice does what it says on the tin. It’s chicken and rice cooked and served in a clay pot, topped off with egg and Chinese sausage. Definitely one to be consumed when you’ve worked up an appetite. Bee Hoon is a type of noodle dish which can be enjoyed with fish, seafood and  / or mixed vegetables. Some great steamed vegetable dishes exist for those of a vegetarian persuasion. Be careful to explicitly ask if they contain any meat or fish though.Image

As the title suggests, and as all those friends rightly stated, this truly is a food heaven. It’s going to be difficult to ever pay restaurant prices again!

TRAVEL TIPS

Hawker centres are scattered across the island and are all pretty good. However,our personal favourite is the Viva local food haven in Tanjung Tokong. From Georgetown take the 101 bus and get off two stops after the big Tesco. Bon appetit!

Categories: Asia, Malaysia, Penang, Penang hawker food | Tags: , , , , | 7 Comments

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